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Seeking relief when your child is coughing?

October 22nd, 2014

by Laura Farleman, PharmD candidate

Is your child’s nagging cough keeping you up at night? The honey in your kitchen may be the alternative to drug-laced syrups parents are searching for to calm their children’s coughs. The thick syrup nature of honey helps to soothe the throat and increase saliva, which can help reduce the urge to cough. Although not always severe, cough causes anxiety and disrupts sleep for parents and children. This drives many parents to seek immediate relief for their children. In recent years popular opinion has drifted toward the use of honey, but has research proven this golden nectar effective?

The current standard of care for cough in children under the age of 6 recommends talking to a doctor. In 2008, manufacturers voluntarily updated cough and cold product labels to state “do not use” in children under 4 years of age. There are few options available when treating cough in children under 4 years old without talking to a doctor. Main treatment options for children over the age of 4 have focused on cough syrups, such as Delsym or Benadryl containing dextromethorphan (DM) or diphenhydramine (DPH), respectively.1

Honey for acute cough in children, a Cochrane review published in June 2014 looked at the effectiveness of honey for cough in children compared to two commonly used cough medications. A Cochrane review is an organized review of primary research in human health care and health policy. It is recognized worldwide as the highest standard in evidence-based health care. In other words, Cochrane reviews provide the most reliable source for health care information. However, this Cochrane review is limited by only including two small studies each with high risk of bias. This review included two random-control trials involving 265 children (aged 2 to 18 years old) comparing the effect of honey to DM, DPH and ‘no treatment’ on cough relief.2 According to Honey for acute cough in children, researchers determined honey to be a better option than ‘no treatment’ and diphenhydramine (Benadryl) options. Honey was found to be equal to dextromethorphan (Delsym) for reducing frequency, severity, and impact of cough on sleep quality.2

The first study used for this review was published by Paul et al. in 2007, included 105 children (aged 2-18 years) and found honey to be a better option for treating cough than no treatment. Comparison of honey and DM did not show differences in the 2007 Paul study. 3 Compared to DM and no treatment, parents favored honey for relief of their child’s nighttime cough and sleep difficulty.3 The second study used for this review, Shadkam 2010, included 139 children (aged 2-5 years) with a cough and revealed that a 2.5-mL honey dose before sleep provided greater relief of cough compared to DM and DPH.1

A journal review by Dr. Ron Feise from 2008 about the Paul 2007 study stated that honey was better than no treatment for cough frequency, but DM was not a better treatment than ‘no treatment’.4 According to this journal review, DM used to treat childhood cough is not supported by the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP)5 or the American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP)6. DM is associated with several adverse side effects in children, such as nausea, vomiting, constipation, and/or dizziness.7 In contrast, honey is generally recognized as safe with the exception of a severe form of food poisoning in children under the age of 1.8 Honey is not appropriate in this age group, because the bacteria in the stomach of infants (less than one year of age) has not fully developed.8 Honey provides a safe and effective option for children (1 year and older) over OTC cough and cold medications, which aren’t recommended for children younger than 6 years old.

Practically, what does this mean? The next time your child develops a cough you might consider grabbing some honey from the kitchen or local grocery store. When your child begins to develop a cough, start by giving your child (12 months or older) ½ teaspoon of honey (2.5 mL), or (if 2 years old or older) two teaspoons (10 mL) of honey. Honey may be taken/given as often as is needed to relieve coughing. The thick syrup of honey coats and soothes the back of the throat, while the sweet taste results in salivation, which thins mucus and reduces the urge to cough. Honey may also help the body fend off colds by alleviating cold symptoms and reducing the length of a cough or cold. In addition to honey, ensure your child drinks enough fluid and consider increasing your child’s intake of vitamin C.9

It is important though, to remember that coughing isn’t completely terrible. It’s the body’s way to clear mucus from the airway. If your child is otherwise healthy and sleeping relatively well, typically there is no reason to suppress a cough. If your child has a fever, prolonged or worsening cough, wheezing, or cold symptoms lasting longer than two weeks please talk to a doctor.10

Have you tried using honey for cough in the past? Did you find it effective? In the future, will you use honey to relieve coughing?

References

 

  1. Shadkam MN, Mozaffari-Khosravi H, Mozayan MR. A comparison of the effect of honey, dextromethorphan, and diphenhydramine on nightly cough and sleep quality in children and their parents. J Altern Complement Med. 2010;16(7):787-793.
  2. Oduwole O, Meremikwu MM, Oyo-Ita A, Udoh EE. Honey for acute cough in children. Evidence-Based Child Health: A Cochrane Review Journal. 2014;9(2):401-444.
  3. Paul IM, Beiler J, McMonagle A, Shaffer ML, Duda L, Berlin CM,Jr. Effect of honey, dextromethorphan, and no treatment on nocturnal cough and sleep quality for coughing children and their parents. Arch Pediatr Adolesc Med. 2007;161(12):1140-1146.
  4. Feise R. Journal review II. [commentary on] paul IM, beiler J, McMonagle A, shaffer ML, duda L, berlin CM jr. effect of honey, dextromethorphan, and no treatment on nocturnal cough and sleep quality for coughing children and their parents. arch pediatr adolesc med 2007. Journal of the American Chiropractic Association. 2008;45(8):20-1.
  5. Committee on Drugs. Use of codeine- and dextromethorphan-containing cough remedies in children. Pediatrics. 1997;99(6):918-920.
  6. Chang AB, Glomb WB. Guidelines for evaluating chronic cough in pediatrics: ACCP evidence-based clinical practice guidelines. Chest. 2006;129(1 Suppl):260S-283S.
  7. Kelly LF. Pediatric cough and cold preparations. Pediatrics in Review. 2004;25(4):115-123.
  8. Grant KA, McLauchlin J, Amar C. Infant botulism: Advice on avoiding feeding honey to babies and other possible risk factors. Community Practitioner. 2013;86(7):44-6.
  9. SCHARDT D. Cold front. Nutrition Action Health Letter. 2014;41(2):11-13.
  10. Teitze, JK. Cough. In: Krinsky DL, Berardi RR, Ferreri SP, et al. Handbook of nonprescription drugs: an interactive approach to self-care. 17th ed. Washington, D.C.: American Pharmacists Association; 2012:205-215

 

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5 Responses to “Seeking relief when your child is coughing?”

  1. Josh Knoebel Says:

    I’ve heard of honey before, and a few relatives use it and swear by it. It is interesting to see the science behind it. I haven’t had a cough in a long while thankfully, but I’ll definitely consider this next time I do.

    One thing I noticed was the recommendations for children were limited to those over the age of 12 months. Why is it not advised in children younger than 1 year?

  2. Mouhannad Saad Says:

    I know honey is effective in treating cough for children, and I have seen people using it as children under 6 years of age are usually referred to a doctor or given honey. I have seen adults using it and mixing honey with tea as it proved to be effective as well for treating not just cough but other sinuses and diseases. I know honey is recommended to have even for adults and I do personally see it effective and for sure I will use honey to treat any coughs and colds even for my kids.
    Great article and very informative.

  3. Laura Farleman Says:

    Josh- To answer your question, honey is not approved for children under the age of 1 because giving honey to children in this age group can cause a severe food poisoning known as infantile botulism. Honey isn’t safe for children in this age group because honey can have bacteria in it, which can cause infants to have a serious reaction since they have not yet develop enough natural bacteria in their digestive tract.

  4. Dr.Hartzler Says:

    Some resources don’t recommend honey until greater than age 2. It depends where you look. But yes Laura is spot on for the reasoning!

  5. Kaysie Brittenham Says:

    I’ve never personally used honey as a treatment for cough. However, the research is fairly convincing that it is an effective option. I’d be curious to know if a certain age group is more likely to benefit from the use of honey than another. Also, I’m curious if honey in combination with tea or another beverage is as effective against coughing as honey itself. I think it’s interesting that honey can be just as effective as DM with fewer adverse effects. I definitely will consider using honey in the future.

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