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Posts Tagged ‘respiratory infections’

 

Proactive Use of Probiotics

Tuesday, October 28th, 2014

by Sarah Winey, PharmD candidate

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), two leading causes of death in young children, under the age of 5, are respiratory infections and diarrhea.1 Both respiratory tract infections (RTIs) and severe diarrhea are often caused by a bacterial infection, so an effective prevention therapy could reduce the incidence of these infections.  Currently, strategies are rarely employed for the prevention of these disease states, except avoidance of foods and conditions that may have an impact, such as fatty foods and environmental irritants. Avoidance of environment irritants can include avoidance of individuals who may carry infection and appropriate hygienic measures, such as hand washing. However, medical treatment frequently occurs only when the patient becomes symptomatic. The standard treatment for diarrhea involves fluid and electrolyte replacement or zinc supplementation, while the standard treatment for bacterial respiratory tract infections often involves antibiotic therapy.1 Probiotic therapy has been suggested as a potential preventative strategy for combating bacterial infections, including those associated with diarrhea and RTI’s.

Probiotics are live, healthy bacteria that are ingested in the form of a dietary supplement or cultured dairy products.2 The human body holds a significant amount of natural healthy bacteria in various locations, including the gastrointestinal (GI) tract.  When harmful bacteria enters the body, it competes for limited space with the healthy bacteria.  In the case of infection, the harmful bacteria overwhelms the system. The goal of probiotic supplementation is to overwhelm at risk areas, such as the GI tract, with healthy bacteria; in fact, the labeled dose is in terms of number of live cells or colonies, usually upward of one million.  In clinical testing, most patients do not experience side effects or experience only minor GI effects such as gas.3 According to current guidelines, probiotics have not been determined to replace standard treatment; nevertheless, the 2007 National Health Interview Survey found that probiotic-type products were the fifth most used natural product for children.3

In March 2014, the Pediatrics journal published a trial with the goal of determining whether a probiotic, Lactobacillus reuteri, had a significant impact on incidence of diarrhea in preschool children. The study was a forward-looking, random-sample, placebo-controlled trial (placebo- an identical substance to probiotic but has no effect) occurring from April 2011-June 2012 in four different day care centers in southeast Mexico City. The study population was comprised of healthy children aged six months to three years, born full term, and of similar socioeconomic status. The primary outcome, or goal, of the study was to determine if the number of days children experienced diarrhea was impacted by probiotic intervention. In addition, the number of days children experienced RTI’s, days of absence caused by diarrhea or RTI, days of antibiotic use, days of medical visits and cost impact due to intervention were studied. The study’s limitations included the possible lack of generalizability based on study location and choice of probiotic species.4

This study provided additional support to the theory that probiotic therapy can impact the prevention of bacterial infections, specifically diarrhea and RTI’s. The results showed that the intervention significantly reduced the incidence of both diarrhea and RTI.4 Additionally, the days of absence, number of medical visits, and antibiotic use were also significantly reduced as a result of probiotic intervention.4 Several other studies have found similar results. For instance, according to a Cochrane research review, probiotics were found to be a beneficial prevention strategy for infection; specifically, this study found that upper respiratory tract infection rate was reduced with probiotic use.5 Another research review of Randomized Control Trials (RCT’s) showed a decrease in duration and stool frequency as a result of probiotic intervention for diarrhea.6

In conclusion, probiotic therapy is a safe and seemingly effective for the prevention of respiratory infections and diarrhea.  This form of therapy may prove especially useful to parents of young children in daycare centers who are constantly in a crowded environment, which could lead to increased infection.  An additional option is the use of yogurt or other cultured dairy products, which also have the capability to reestablish normal, healthy bacteria in the GI tract. Currently probiotics are not an officially approved recommendation for children, should they be?

References:

  1. World Health Organization.Children: Reducing mortality. Media centre: Fact Sheets Web site. http://www.who.int/mediacentre/factsheets/fs178/en/. Updated 2014. Accessed September 20, 2014.
  2. EBSCO CAM Review B. Probiotics. Salem Press Encyclopedia Of Health [serial online]. January 2014;Available from: Research Starters, Ipswich, MA. Accessed August 31, 2014.
  3. National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine. Oral probiotics: An introduction. 2012.
  4. Gutierrez-Castrellon P, Lopez-Velazquez G, Parra M, et al. Diarrhea in Preschool Children and Lactobacillus reuteri: A Randomized Controlled Trial. Pediatrics [serial online]. n.d.;133(4):E904-E909. Available from: Science Citation Index, Ipswich, MA. Accessed September 24, 2014.
  5. Hao Q. Probiotics for preventing acute upper respiratory tract infections. Cochrane Database Of Systematic Reviews [serial online]. July 26, 2011;(9)Available from: Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews, Ipswich, MA. Accessed September 20, 2014.
  6. Applegate J, Fischer Walker C, Ambikapathi R, Black R. Systematic review of probiotics for the treatment of community-acquired acute diarrhea in children. BMC Public Health [serial online]. October 2, 2013;13(Suppl 3):1-8. Available from: Academic Search Complete, Ipswich, MA. Accessed September 1, 2014.